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As technological innovation increases so too do customers’ demands.
As technological innovation increases so too do customers’ demands.

A smart little tag with a big message

BRAND ACTIVITY

Pyrotec - Mar 1st, 11:43

As technological innovation increases so too do customers’ demands. With so much choice on offer, consumers not only know what a great customer experience is, but they also know when a company makes them feel special and where they’d prefer to spend their money. Building lasting relationships with consumers and earning their loyalty is, therefore, a primary focus for brand owners.

One way for brands to earn consumers’ loyalty is with Near Field Communication (NFC) technology.

What is NFC technology?

NFC is a wireless technology that’s embedded into most smartphones. It has an array of applications from mobile payments to NFC tags embedded into products, labels and promotional material. The beauty of these tags is that they interact with consumers’ smartphones using a radio signal. And, unlike Bluetooth, you don’t have to manually pair two NFC devices. They also use a fraction of the battery power used by Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

These smart little tags can store varied information, including short lines of text, such as a web address or contact details, as well as links to apps in the Google Play Store.

NFC tags are passive devices. They can’t process on their own and rely on an active device (smartphone) to come into range before they activate, using a magnetic field. Generally, they only operate within a field of less than a few centimetres.

What are the benefits of NFC technology?

Because NFC tags contain unique identifiers by item, not just product type, their content can be targeted and dynamic.

These tags are small and can be integrated into packaging without impacting a brand’s identity. What’s more, because of the tag’s unique ID, counterfeiting is prevented, customisation is possible, and authentication is enabled.

The NFC tags create a direct link for brand owners to engage with consumers by offering usage instructions, coupons, cross-selling initiatives and loyalty programmes, as well as product authentication.

Another area that’s seen the uptake of NFC-tagged labels is the pharmaceutical sector. The tags contain dosage and script refill information, for example, that can be tracked by medical insurers and doctors, as well as for product authentication and patient safety.

Fix-a-Form® booklet labels, available from Pyrotec PackMedia, increase brand awareness with their enhanced graphics and ability to communicate and appeal to consumers in several languages simultaneously. With their ability to provide opportunities for value adds, such as recipes, inserts, coupons, collectables and cross-promotions, they are also an ideal vehicle for an NFC tag to add to a brand’s ability to communicate and attract shoppers.

Click here for more information on Pyrotec 

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