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Mexican lager brand Corona will pilot plastic-free six-pack rings which are made from plant-based biodegradable fibres, with a mix of by-product waste and compostable materials.
Mexican lager brand Corona will pilot plastic-free six-pack rings which are made from plant-based biodegradable fibres, with a mix of by-product waste and compostable materials.

Corona to introduce plastic-free rings on its beer cans

LIQUOR NEWS

Food Bev - Nov 30th 2018, 09:07

Mexican lager brand Corona will pilot plastic-free six-pack rings which are made from plant-based biodegradable fibres, with a mix of by-product waste and compostable materials. 

The brand said it sees an opportunity to help redesign a common source of plastic in the category.

Earlier this year, Carlsberg announced plans to ditch plastic rings which connect multi-packs of its beer and replace them with glue.

Corona said that if left in the environment, its six-pack rings break down into organic material that is not harmful to wildlife. It added that the industry standard plastic six-pack rings are made from a photodegradable form of polyethene “that results in increasingly smaller pieces of plastic if not recycled”.

The plastic-free rings will be piloted in the town of Tulum in Mexico next year, with plans to test in the UK later in the year.

Corona added that the move forms part of its commitment with non-profit organisation Parley for the Oceans.

Evan Ellman, Corona Better World Director, said: “The beach is an important part of Corona’s DNA and we have been working with Parley to address the issue on the frontlines where plastic is physically accumulating.

“We also recognise the influence a global brand like Corona can have on the industry, and with the support of Parley, are pursuing scalable solutions like plastic-free six-pack rings that can become a new standard to avoid plastic for good.”

Cyrill Gutsch, founder and CEO of Parley for the Oceans, added: “Our oceans are under attack. We are taking their life in rapid speed, destroying the chemistry that allows us to be here. Therefore, we are bidding on the few who take the lead in true change. The ones who are shaping the future with us."

“Corona is such an ocean champion, a powerful ally in our war against marine plastic pollution – and in building the material revolution that will lead us beyond it. We share the goal of phasing plastic out for good because we simply can’t afford its toxic impact anymore.”
FoodBev 

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