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When it comes to the key elements we need to survive, water is at the top of the priority list.
When it comes to the key elements we need to survive, water is at the top of the priority list.

3 ways smart technology can help your business save water

MARKETING NEWS

By Shannon Ash, Rogerwilco - Nov 2nd 2018, 09:01

When it comes to the key elements we need to survive, water is at the top of the priority list. While it’s easy to find alternative sources to generate energy for businesses to run, it’s near impossible to increase our access to fresh potable water when it’s already so limited. This is why technology is essential for business success, allowing businesses the ability to grow and make smarter water decisions.  

If businesses don’t act soon, future generations are going to be at risk. Technology can help to predict water shortages and save water where possible. In addition to these savings, businesses can invest in their own water treatment facility to reduce their water footprint as a whole.

Here are a few ways in which technology can help to save water:

Real-time measurement and monitoring
The beauty about artificial intelligence (AI) technology is that it can help business owners to make better decisions in the moment. For instance, you can measure your water usage and monitor how it affects your bottom line in real-time. Technology takes the guesswork out of “trying” to save and only being able to see your meter reading at the end of the month. If you feel that you are overusing water, implement a water audit to help you analyse where you’re using water and how you can reduce that. Once you have seen these results, you will be able to make conscious decisions in the moment to save water.

Advanced leakage control and detection
In large commercial and industrial buildings, there are plenty of water leakages. And because you don’t always know what is happening in bathrooms or factories, you are possibly wasting plenty of water without even knowing. By introducing water technology into your business, you will be able to monitor any leaks and detect any faulty plumbing in advance, alerting your team to take action in real-time. Should you be away from work and not able to assist with the issue in the moment, your technology unit should offer you the opportunity to shut down any water activity in the office. This will also help you to avoid any concerns about workers leaving the water running or forgetting to switch it off.

Data-driven water distribution
When you are supplying water to large areas, it’s important to monitor your distribution. This can be a challenging task, especially if you don’t have the correct technology to help you make accurate recordings of your usage. Smart technology can monitor your water consumption pattern over a long period of time as well as let you know how much you’ve managed to save in water and in money.

This type of technology is particularly useful in agriculture for irrigation purposes as well as in construction when making use of water for projects. It will help you to avoid any wastage or overwatering in some instances, which will look after the environment and save the little water you have available to you.

The world is rapidly growing which doesn’t mean that the availability of water is growing too. In fact, with climate conditions and external environmental factors that are beyond human control, access to water is becoming less and less. If your business relies on water, you need to make use of technology to assist you with your decisions. You can rely on data to give you accurate water readings, as well as show you how much water you will have access to in years to come. This can help you to invest in technology now and set up your own wastewater plant that provides you with the water you need to survive.

Final thoughts

With so many water treatment services to choose from, you can make a difference by simply investing in the correct equipment or seeking advice from water treatment companies which can help you to automate your water usage. Not only will this give you peace of mind in knowing that you don’t need to wait on water audits or water readings to see how much water you’re using, but now you can simply request to see the data in the moment and adjust your system in real-time. This type of technology can also help to detect any future issues which is helpful for large businesses operating with plenty of staff members and machinery.

If you’re able to manage your flow and take further steps to recycle your existing water supply, you will be able to protect the little water we have left, and available to us, while reducing your business costs significantly. Reusing brackish water and filtering it out can be used for many reasons, except for human and animal consumption. This approach, alone, can reduce wastage and help to protect the environment.

 

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