Advertise with fastmoving.co.za
 
 

Compass Group commits to cage-free eggs only in global supply chain
Compass Group commits to cage-free eggs only in global supply chain

Compass Group commits to cage-free eggs only in global supply chain

FMCG SUPPLIER NEWS

Bizcommunity.com - Sep 19th 2016, 09:23

Food service company Compass Group, with operations in 50 countries and serving around four billion meals a year, have announced that it will source only cage-free eggs for its global liquid and shell egg supply chain by 2025. 

Humane Society International and The Humane Society of the United States have worked with Compass Group around the globe for several years on this and other animal welfare issues, securing cage-free policies for the company’s US and Mexico operations.

Chetana Mirle, director of HSI Farm Animals, said: “By adopting a worldwide commitment to only source cage-free eggs, Compass Group will improve the lives of millions of animals each year. The cage-free egg movement has clearly become one of global significance, and we look forward to working with more companies on similar policies.”

In its statement, Nicki Crayfourd, director of group health, safety and environment at Compass Group PLC, commented, “Improving the welfare of farm animals is a key focus for our business and we've supported the sourcing of cage-free eggs since 2009. This commitment marks the next step in our journey and we look forward to continuing to work with partners such as Compassion in World Farming, Humane Society International and The Humane League who provide invaluable support and guidance.”

Egg-laying hens are often confined for their whole lives in wire battery cages so small and crowded with other birds that the animals cannot even fully stretch their wings. The use of conventional battery cages for laying hens is banned or being phased out under laws or regulations throughout the EU, five US states, New Zealand and Bhutan. The majority of states in India, which is the world’s third-largest egg producer, have declared that the use of battery cages violates the country’s animal welfare legislation, and the country is debating a national ban.

The announcement follows a similar commitment made recently by Sodexo, the world’s second largest food service provider, to also switch to a 100 percent cage-free egg supply chain for their global operations. Compass Group joins a growing number of companies that have committed to cage-free egg policies worldwide including Alsea, Unilever, Grupo Bimbo and Nestlé. In South Africa, Woolworth’s has adopted a cage-free egg policy, and cage-free and free-range eggs can also be found at Pick and Pay, Checker’s, and Spar.All rights reserved ©. Bixcommunity.com 

Related News

Exclusive leases must fall: Commission cracks whip on Shoprite, Pick n pay, Spar, Woolies
26/11/2019 - 09:57
The Competition Commission Inquiry into Grocery Retail, published on Monday, called for an end to the exclusive leases negotiated by national retail chains in all shopping malls across the country in a bid to open up access to markets for smaller players.

Spar sees big jump in profit as consumers turn to store labels and alcohol
13/11/2019 - 11:43
Listed retailer Spar has published its financial results for the full year ended September 2019, reporting an 8.4% jump in revenue, with operating profits up 7.2% despite tough conditions across its operations.

Unilever to halve use of new plastic as uproar over waste grows
10/10/2019 - 10:28
Unilever pledged to halve its use of newly made plastic by 2025 as the consumer-goods industry wrestles with growing criticism of the environmental impact of throwaway packaging.

Unilever achieves renewable energy target before 2020 target
17/09/2019 - 09:17
Unilever has announced that all its sites across five continents are now powered by 100% renewable grid electricity, meeting its 2020 target ahead of time.

Consumers drink while retailers keep the tills active and lights on
10/09/2019 - 11:19
One in five South Africans is unemployed and economic growth remains anaemic, but retailers manage to grow, demonstrating that they still have some defensive qualities.